REASONS CULTISM SPREADS TO SECONDARY SCHOOL

CULTISM SPREADS
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It, therefore,  reasons cultism spreads to secondary schools and called on the federal and state governments to set up anti-cultism  to combat the menace.

CULTISM SPREADS

 

 

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The call followed the consideration and adoption of a motion of urgent public importance moved by Nwajuba Chukwuemeka from; Imo State.

Moving the motion, Nwajiuba said; if no action was; taken to tackle the unhealthy development, it might have devastating effects on families. He said:

“Though cultism spreads and started in 1962 and restricted to tertiary institutions, it has now spread to primary and secondary schools.

“Cultism spreads to our primary and secondary schools, with pupils less than 16 years joining cult groups. “If care is not taken, its effect on families, community, religion and the country at large will be; devastating.

“The original intent has been long defeated, the deaths of youths are becoming alarming, as issues that could have been resolved amicably snowball into mayhem. “Cultism was a strict university thing, but today many homes have been penetrated by cultism.

Even in our primary and secondary schools at present, there are; pupils inducted to unleash mayhem.”
Contributing to the motion, Nicholas Ossai (PDP, Delta), said the effect of cultism on education standard was; becoming real as the elite has started withdrawing their wards from public institutions to private ones
He said that the National Orientation Agency, NOA, should be; empowered to deepen its advocacy functions.

“Cultism reduces the standard of education because the rich allow their kids to go to a private university.” “The solution is in the Student Union Act, which I sponsored in the 8th Assembly.

The second issue is that information should circulate that if you are; caught, you will not get admission again. ‘’We need to empower the NOA for advocacy, even politicians encourage cultism, as they use cultists for the election campaign,” he said.

On his own, the Minority leader of the House, Ndudi Elumelu, asked parents to take responsibility for their children, faulting the drift from tradition institutions.
The motion, when subjected to a voice vote, received overwhelming support from lawmakers.

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