SITUATIONAL INTERVIEW QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS IN 2020

Situational Interview Questions and Answers in 2020.

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SITUATIONAL INTERVIEW QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS IN 2020

Because every industry and job role has a unique set of challenges and opportunities, employers must assess how well candidates are prepared to manage these circumstances before they make a hiring decision. Here are some top situational interview questions you should prepare for before going for that interview.

SITUATIONAL INTERVIEW QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS IN 2020

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What are Situational Interview Questions?
Situational interview questions focus on how you’ll handle real-life scenarios you may encounter in the workplace, and how you’ve handled similar situations in previous roles. Asking these questions helps employers better understand your thought process and assess your problem-solving, self-management and communication skills.

Situational questions give you the opportunity to show off your quick-thinking skills and show hiring managers how you respond to curveballs, which is critical information when they are deciding whether you are qualified for the role.
They also give you a chance to highlight how you use your professional experience, abilities and personal strengths to overcome business challenges and meet goals.

Top Situational Interview Questions
Here are seven situational questions you may face in your next interview and what recruiters or hiring managers are looking for in your answer:

How would you handle it if your team resisted a new idea you introduced?
How would you handle it if your employee wasn’t meeting your expectations, or was performing below average?

What would you do if you were assigned to work closely with a colleague on a project, but you two just couldn’t seem to see eye-to-eye?

What would you do if you were working hard on a project and were almost finished when the goals or priorities were changed?

How would you handle an instance of receiving criticism from a superior?
What would you do if you were almost finished with a project on a tight deadline, when you realize you’d made a mistake back in the beginning that required you to start over?
How would you handle it if you were unsatisfied by an aspect of your job?

SITUATIONAL INTERVIEW QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS IN 2020
1. How would you handle it if your team resisted a new idea you introduced?
How would you handle it if your employee wasn’t meeting your expectations, or was performing below average?
What recruiters want to hear: If you’re looking to fill a leadership position, you’ll need to show you handle tough conversations with employees. Hiring managers will want a candidate to express honesty and transparency with each employee while recognizing the importance of constructive feedback.

3. What would you do if you were assigned to work closely with a colleague on a project, but you two just couldn’t seem to see eye-to-eye?
What recruiters want to hear: This question looks for a candidate who aims to understand their colleague’s point of view. You’ll want to demonstrate flexibility and ability to compromise. Plus, it’s simply important to give recruiters a sense for how you handle conflict.

4. What would you do if you were working hard on a project and were almost finished when the goals or priorities were changed?
What recruiters want to hear: A good answer to this question depends on the role you’re applying to.

Show flexibility by mentioning that you would stay up late, adjust priorities, and manage to finish the project the way it needed to be finished. If the position is a junior level or requires someone to be adaptable to unpredictable deadlines or expectations, you’ll want to show a level of flexibility.

5. How would you handle an instance of receiving criticism from a superior?
What recruiters want to hear: This question enables you to display your ability to learn, grow, and accept mistakes. You want to show that you use feedback to make changes while demonstrating emotional maturity. Essentially, you want to show that you are coachable.

6. What would you do if you were almost finished with a project on a tight deadline when you realize you’d made a mistake back at the beginning that required you to start over?
What recruiters want to hear: No one is perfect, and it’s good if you can admit to a situation where you made a mistake that required a re-do of a project. More importantly, you’ll want to show that you can be honest with supervisors about your mistakes, rather than trying to cover them up.

You want to prove that you look at mistakes as opportunities to learn, rather than as embarrassing failures.
7. How would you handle it if you were unsatisfied by an aspect of your job?
What recruiters want to hear: It’s not practical or necessary to act like you love all aspects of your job equally. Instead, you want to demonstrate a good level of professional maturity, understand some tasks are less enjoyable than others, and appreciate the necessity of those tasks for the company’s bottom line.

Great candidates don’t just want to know what you think; they want to know what you plan to do and how they will fit into those plans. Make use of any opportunity that comes your way wisely. Kindly share it after reading.

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